“They blame those who remain silent, they blame those who speak much, they blame those who speak in moderation. There is none in the world who is not blamed.”

they blame those who remain silent

From the Dhammapada, verse 227:

“They blame those who remain silent, they blame those who speak much, they blame those who speak in moderation. There is none in the world who is not blamed.”
–The Buddha

“They blame those who remain silent, they blame those who speak much, they blame those who speak in moderation. There is none in the world who is not blamed.” –The Buddha Click To Tweet “They blame those who remain silent ... who speak much ... who speak in moderation.” The Buddha Click To Tweet “There is none in the world who is not blamed.” The Buddha. Click To Tweet

“Both formerly and now, it is only suffering that I describe, and the cessation of suffering.” The Buddha

“Both formerly and now, it is only suffering that I describe, and the cessation of suffering.”
The Buddha (from the Sutta Nipata)

“Both formerly and now, it is only suffering that I describe, and the cessation of suffering.” The Buddha Click To Tweet

“Purity and impurity depend on oneself; no one can purify another.”

From the Dhammapada:

“By oneself is evil done; by oneself is one defiled. By oneself is evil left undone; by oneself is one made pure. Purity and impurity depend on oneself; no one can purify another.”
The Buddha

“Purity and impurity depend on oneself; no one can purify another.”—The Buddha Click To Tweet

“Radiate boundless love towards the entire world…”

This is a genuine quote from the Buddhist scriptures. It’s from the Karaniya Metta Sutta:

“Radiate boundless love towards the entire world.” —Buddha Click To Tweet “Radiate boundless love towards the entire world—above, below, and across—unhindered, without ill will, without enmity.”—The Buddha Click To Tweet

“We will develop and cultivate the liberation of mind by lovingkindness, make it our vehicle, make it our basis, stabilize it, exercise ourselves in it, and fully perfect it.” The Buddha

This is a canonical quote, and it’s rather lovely. It’s from the Samyutta Nikaya, and in Bhikkhu Bodhi’s translation you’ll find it on page 708:

“Therefore, bhikkhus, you should train yourselves thus: ‘We will develop and cultivate the liberation of mind by lovingkindness, make it our vehicle, make it our basis, stabilize it, exercise ourselves in it, and fully perfect it.’ Thus should you train yourselves.”

“We will develop and cultivate the liberation of mind by lovingkindness, make it our vehicle, make it our basis, stabilize it, exercise ourselves in it, and fully perfect it.” The Buddha Click To Tweet

“Better than a thousand useless words is one useful word, upon hearing which one attains peace.”—The Buddha

“Better than a thousand useless words is one useful word, upon hearing which one attains peace.”—The Buddha

This is a genuine quote from the Buddhist scriptures. It’s from the Dhammapada, verse 100.

“Better than a thousand useless words is one useful word, upon hearing which one attains peace.”—The Buddha Click To Tweet

 

“Should someone do good, let them do it again and again. They should develop this habit, for the accumulation of goodness brings joy.” The Buddha

This is a genuine quote from the Buddhist scriptures. It’s from the Dhammapada, verse 118:

“Should someone do good, let them do it again and again. They should develop this habit, for the accumulation of goodness brings joy.”—The Buddha.

“Should someone do good, let them do it again and again. They should develop this habit, for the accumulation of goodness brings joy.”—The Buddha Click To Tweet

“The one in whom no longer exist the craving and thirst that perpetuate becoming; how could you track that Awakened one, trackless, and of limitless range.”

From the Dhammapada, verse 180:

“The one in whom no longer exist the craving and thirst that perpetuate becoming; how could you track that Awakened one, trackless, and of limitless range?”
The Buddha

“How could you track that Awakened one, trackless, and of limitless range?” The Buddha Click To Tweet

“The root of suffering is attachment.” The Buddha

This is a saying from the Pali canon, upadhi dukkhassa mūlanti, which means “Attachment is the root of suffering.” So this is a genuine canonical quote.

You’ll find it in this sutta, but translated by Thanissaro as “Acquisition is the root of stress.” His translations are rather idiosyncratic.

In this translation of the same sutta it’s “acquisition is the root of suffering.”

Bhikkhu Bodhi’s translation (not available online, but in The Middle Length Discourses of the Buddha, page 868) has “attachment is the root of suffering,” although he sometimes has “acquisition” in place of “attachment,” in various repetitions of the phrase.

“The root of suffering is attachment.” The Buddha Click To Tweet