“If a man going down into a river, swollen and swiftly flowing, is carried away by the current — how can he help others across?” – The Buddha

If a man going down into a river

“If a man going down into a river, swollen and swiftly flowing, is carried away by the current — how can he help others across?” – The Buddha

(From the Sutta Nipata)

“If a man going down into a river, swollen and swiftly flowing, is carried away by the current — how can he help others across?” – The Buddha Click To Tweet

“Conquer anger with non-anger. Conquer badness with goodness. Conquer meanness with generosity. Conquer dishonesty with truth.” The Buddha

From the Dhammapada, verse 223:

“Conquer anger with non-anger. Conquer badness with goodness.” The Buddha Click To Tweet “Conquer meanness with generosity. Conquer dishonesty with truth.” The Buddha Click To Tweet

 

“Irrigators channel waters; fletchers straighten arrows; carpenters bend wood; the wise master themselves.” The Buddha

This is a genuine Buddha quote. It’s from the Dhammapada, verse 80:

Irrigators channel waters;
fletchers straighten arrows;
carpenters shape wood;
the wise master themselves.

Irrigators channel waters; fletchers straighten arrows; carpenters bend wood; the wise master themselves.” The Buddha Click To Tweet

“One should train in deeds of merit—generosity, a balanced life, developing a loving mind—that yield long-lasting happiness.”

“One should train in [three] deeds of merit—generosity, a balanced life, developing a loving mind—that yield long-lasting happiness.”

This is a genuine quote from the Buddhist scriptures. It’s from a scripture called the Itivuttika, here in a translation by John Ireland.

“One should train in three deeds of merit—generosity, a balanced life, developing a loving mind—that yield long-lasting happiness.”—The Buddha Click To Tweet

“May all beings have happy minds.” —The Buddha

“Whatever living beings there may be — feeble or strong, long, stout, or of medium size, short, small, large, those seen or those unseen, those dwelling far or near, those who are born as well as those yet to be born — may all beings have happy minds.”
The Buddha, Karaniya Metta Sutta

“May all beings have happy minds.” —The Buddha Click To Tweet

“The one in whom no longer exist the craving and thirst that perpetuate becoming; how could you track that Awakened one, trackless, and of limitless range.”

From the Dhammapada, verse 180:

“The one in whom no longer exist the craving and thirst that perpetuate becoming; how could you track that Awakened one, trackless, and of limitless range?”
The Buddha

“How could you track that Awakened one, trackless, and of limitless range?” The Buddha Click To Tweet

“See them, floundering in their sense of mine, like fish in the puddles of a dried-up stream — and, seeing this, live with no mine, not forming attachment for states of becoming.” The Buddha

This is a genuine quote from the Buddhist scriptures. It’s from the Sutta Nipata.

“See them, floundering in their sense of mine, like fish in the puddles of a dried-up stream — and, seeing this, live with no mine, not forming attachment to experiences.”
—The Buddha

“Live with no sense of ‘mine,’ not forming attachment to experiences.” The Buddha Click To Tweet

“The thing that is disliked by me is also disliked by others. Since I dislike this thing, how can I inflict it on someone else?” The Buddha

This is a genuine quote from the Buddhist scriptures. It’s from Saṃyutta Nikāya, 55.7.

“The thing that is disliked by me is also disliked by others. Since I dislike this thing, how can I inflict it on someone else?”—The Buddha

“The thing that is disliked by me is also disliked by others. Since I dislike this thing, how can I inflict it on someone else?” —The Buddha Click To Tweet

“The calmed say that what is well-spoken is best; second, that one should say what is right, not unrighteous; third, what’s pleasing, not displeasing; fourth, what is true, not false.” – The Buddha

“The calmed say that what is well-spoken is best;
second, that one should say what is right, not unrighteous;
third, what’s pleasing, not displeasing;
fourth, what is true, not false.” – The Buddha

(From the Sutta Nipata)

“The calmed say that what is well-spoken is best; second, that one should say what is right, not unrighteous; third, what's pleasing, not displeasing; fourth, what is true, not false.” – The Buddha Click To Tweet