“Conquer anger with non-anger. Conquer badness with goodness. Conquer meanness with generosity. Conquer dishonesty with truth.” The Buddha

conquer anger with non-anger

From the Dhammapada, verse 223:

“Conquer anger with non-anger. Conquer badness with goodness.” The Buddha Click To Tweet “Conquer meanness with generosity. Conquer dishonesty with truth.” The Buddha Click To Tweet

 

“He who can curb his wrath as soon as it arises, as a timely antidote will check snake’s venom that so quickly spreads, — such a monk gives up the here and the beyond, just as a serpent sheds its worn-out skin.” The Buddha

“He who can curb his wrath as soon as it arises, as a timely antidote will check snake’s venom that so quickly spreads — such a monk gives up the here and the beyond, just as a serpent sheds its worn-out skin.”

The Buddha (from the Sutta Nipata)

“He who can curb his wrath as soon as it arises, as a timely antidote will check snake’s venom that so quickly spreads, — such a monk gives up the here and the beyond, just as a serpent sheds its worn-out skin.” The Buddha Click To Tweet

“When watching after yourself, you watch after others. When watching after others, you watch after yourself.” The Buddha

“When watching after yourself, you watch after others. When watching after others, you watch after yourself.” The Buddha

“When watching after yourself, you watch after others. When watching after others, you watch after yourself.” The Buddha Click To Tweet

(From the Samyutta Nikaya)

“Better it is to live one day seeing the rise and fall of things than to live a hundred years without ever seeing the rise and fall of things.” The Buddha

This is a genuine Buddha quote, from the Dhammapada:

Better it is to live one day seeing the rise and fall of things than to live a hundred years without ever seeing the rise and fall of things.

“Better it is to live one day seeing the rise and fall of things than to live a hundred years without ever seeing the rise and fall of things.” The Buddha Click To Tweet

“One should train in deeds of merit—generosity, a balanced life, developing a loving mind—that yield long-lasting happiness.”

“One should train in [three] deeds of merit—generosity, a balanced life, developing a loving mind—that yield long-lasting happiness.”

This is a genuine quote from the Buddhist scriptures. It’s from a scripture called the Itivuttika, here in a translation by John Ireland.

“One should train in three deeds of merit—generosity, a balanced life, developing a loving mind—that yield long-lasting happiness.”—The Buddha Click To Tweet

“Whatever is not yours: let go of it. Your letting go of it will be for your long-term happiness & benefit.”

“Whatever is not yours: let go of it. Your letting go of it will be for your long-term happiness and benefit” is a genuine quote from the Buddhist scriptures. It’s from the Na Tumhaka Sutta of the Samyutta Nikaya.

“Whatever is not yours: let go of it. Your letting go of it will be for your long-term happiness & benefit.” The Buddha. Click To Tweet

“Let none find fault with others; let none see the omissions and commissions of others. But let one see one’s own acts, done and undone.” The Buddha

This is a genuine Buddha quote. It’s from the Dhammapada, verse 50.

Let none find fault with others; let none see the omissions and commissions of others. But let one see one’s own acts, done and undone. – The Buddha.

“Let none find fault with others; let none see the omissions and commissions of others. But let one see one’s own acts, done and undone.” The Buddha Click To Tweet

“A mind unruffled by the vagaries of fortune, from sorrow freed, from defilements cleansed, from fear liberated — this is the greatest blessing.” The Buddha

“A mind unruffled by the vagaries of fortune, from sorrow freed, from defilements cleansed, from fear liberated — this is the greatest blessing.” The Buddha (Mangala Sutta).

“A mind unruffled by the vagaries of fortune, from sorrow freed, from defilements cleansed, from fear liberated — this is the greatest blessing.” The Buddha Click To Tweet

“Those who cling to perceptions and views wander the world offending people.” The Buddha

This striking verse is found in the Magandiya Suta in the Sutta Nipata, which is generally held to be one of the oldest texts in the Pali canon.

Bhikkhu Thanissaro translates this as:

“Those who grasp at perceptions and views
go about butting their heads in the world.”

Fausböll, a 19th century pioneer translator, has:

“But those who grasped after marks and philosophical views, they wander about in the world annoying people.”

Suttas.net has:

“Those attached to the notion ‘I am’ and to views
Roam the world offending people.”

The translator notes that “I am” is not in the quotation, but that its inclusion is warranted by material nearby.

The original Pali is:

Saññaca diṭṭhiñca ye aggahesuṃ
Te ghaṭṭayantā vicaranti loketi.

My rendition would be:

Those who cling to perceptions (saññā) and views (diṭṭhi)
Wander (vicarati) the world offending (ghaṭṭeti) people.

[Added later: Bhikkhu Varado’s translation, which I just discovered, is almost identical to mine: “Those attached to perception and views / roam the world offending people.”]

“Those who cling to perceptions and views wander the world offending people.” The Buddha Click To Tweet