“They blame those who remain silent, they blame those who speak much, they blame those who speak in moderation. There is none in the world who is not blamed.”

From the Dhammapada, verse 227:

“They blame those who remain silent, they blame those who speak much, they blame those who speak in moderation. There is none in the world who is not blamed.”
–The Buddha

“They blame those who remain silent, they blame those who speak much, they blame those who speak in moderation. There is none in the world who is not blamed.” –The Buddha Click To Tweet “They blame those who remain silent ... who speak much ... who speak in moderation.” The Buddha Click To Tweet “There is none in the world who is not blamed.” The Buddha. Click To Tweet

“Should a person do good, let him do it again and again. Let him find pleasure therein, for blissful is the accumulation of good.” The Buddha

“Should a person do good, let him do it again and again. Let him find pleasure therein, for blissful is the accumulation of good.” The Buddha (Dhammapada, verse 118)

“Should a person do good, let them do it again and again. Let them find pleasure therein, for blissful is the accumulation of good.” The Buddha Click To Tweet

“Better it is to live one day seeing the rise and fall of things than to live a hundred years without ever seeing the rise and fall of things.” The Buddha

This is a genuine Buddha quote, from the Dhammapada:

Better it is to live one day seeing the rise and fall of things than to live a hundred years without ever seeing the rise and fall of things.

“Better it is to live one day seeing the rise and fall of things than to live a hundred years without ever seeing the rise and fall of things.” The Buddha Click To Tweet

“The root of suffering is attachment.” The Buddha

This is a saying from the Pali canon, upadhi dukkhassa mūlanti, which means “Attachment is the root of suffering.” So this is a genuine canonical quote.

You’ll find it in this sutta, but translated by Thanissaro as “Acquisition is the root of stress.” His translations are rather idiosyncratic.

In this translation of the same sutta it’s “acquisition is the root of suffering.”

Bhikkhu Bodhi’s translation (not available online, but in The Middle Length Discourses of the Buddha, page 868) has “attachment is the root of suffering,” although he sometimes has “acquisition” in place of “attachment,” in various repetitions of the phrase.

“The root of suffering is attachment.” The Buddha Click To Tweet

“The calmed say that what is well-spoken is best; second, that one should say what is right, not unrighteous; third, what’s pleasing, not displeasing; fourth, what is true, not false.” – The Buddha

“The calmed say that what is well-spoken is best;
second, that one should say what is right, not unrighteous;
third, what’s pleasing, not displeasing;
fourth, what is true, not false.” – The Buddha

(From the Sutta Nipata)

“The calmed say that what is well-spoken is best; second, that one should say what is right, not unrighteous; third, what's pleasing, not displeasing; fourth, what is true, not false.” – The Buddha Click To Tweet

“Let none find fault with others; let none see the omissions and commissions of others. But let one see one’s own acts, done and undone.” The Buddha

This is a genuine Buddha quote. It’s from the Dhammapada, verse 50.

Let none find fault with others; let none see the omissions and commissions of others. But let one see one’s own acts, done and undone. – The Buddha.

“Let none find fault with others; let none see the omissions and commissions of others. But let one see one’s own acts, done and undone.” The Buddha Click To Tweet

“If they are neither traceable in the Discourses nor verifiable by the Discipline, one must conclude thus: ‘Certainly, this is not the Blessed One’s utterance’“ The Buddha

Without approval and without scorn, but carefully studying the sentences word by word, one should trace them in the Discourses and verify them by the Discipline. If they are neither traceable in the Discourses nor verifiable by the Discipline, one must conclude thus: ‘Certainly, this is not the Blessed One’s utterance; this has been misunderstood by that bhikkhu — or by that community, or by those elders, or by that elder.’ In that way, bhikkhus, you should reject it.

This is from the Mahaparinibbana Sutta.

”“If Click To Tweet are neither traceable in the Discourses nor verifiable by the Discipline, one must conclude thus: ‘Certainly, this is not the Blessed One’s utterance; this has been misunderstood.”—The Buddha” username=”realbuddhaquot1″]

“Conquer anger with non-anger. Conquer badness with goodness. Conquer meanness with generosity. Conquer dishonesty with truth.” The Buddha

From the Dhammapada, verse 223:

“Conquer anger with non-anger. Conquer badness with goodness.” The Buddha Click To Tweet “Conquer meanness with generosity. Conquer dishonesty with truth.” The Buddha Click To Tweet

 

“Whatever is not yours: let go of it. Your letting go of it will be for your long-term happiness & benefit.”

“Whatever is not yours: let go of it. Your letting go of it will be for your long-term happiness and benefit” is a genuine quote from the Buddhist scriptures. It’s from the Na Tumhaka Sutta of the Samyutta Nikaya.

“Whatever is not yours: let go of it. Your letting go of it will be for your long-term happiness & benefit.” The Buddha. Click To Tweet