“To support mother and father, to cherish partner and children, and to be engaged in peaceful occupation — this is the greatest blessing.”

This is a genuine quote from the Buddhist scriptures. It’s from the Mangala Sutta.

“To support mother and father, to cherish partner* and children, and to be engaged in peaceful occupation — this is the greatest blessing.”

*In the original it’s “wife,” rather than partner. The language has been changed to make it more inclusive.

“To support mother and father, & cherish partner & children—this is the greatest blessing.” Buddha

“The root of suffering is attachment.” The Buddha

This is a saying from the Pali canon, upadhi dukkhassa mūlanti, which means “Attachment is the root of suffering.” So this is a genuine canonical quote.

You’ll find it in this sutta, but translated by Thanissaro as “Acquisition is the root of stress.” His translations are rather idiosyncratic.

In this translation of the same sutta it’s “acquisition is the root of suffering.”

Bhikkhu Bodhi’s translation (not available online, but in The Middle Length Discourses of the Buddha, page 868) has “attachment is the root of suffering,” although he sometimes has “acquisition” in place of “attachment,” in various repetitions of the phrase.

“Whatever is not yours: let go of it. Your letting go of it will be for your long-term happiness & benefit.”

“Whatever is not yours: let go of it. Your letting go of it will be for your long-term happiness and benefit” is a genuine quote from the Buddhist scriptures. It’s from the Na Tumhaka Sutta of the Samyutta Nikaya.

“Whatever is not yours … your letting go of it will be for your longterm happiness & benefit.” Buddha

“Some do not understand that we must die, But those who do realize this settle their quarrels.” The Buddha

This is a genuine Buddha quote. It’s the 6th verse of the Dhammapada:

Some do not understand
that we must die,
But those who do realize this
settle their quarrels.
~ The Buddha

“Having gone on his almsround, the sage should then go to the forest, standing or taking a seat at the foot of a tree. The enlightened one, intent on jhana, should find delight in the forest, should practice jhana at the foot of a tree, attaining his own satisfaction.” The Buddha

“Having gone on his almsround, the sage should then go to the forest, standing or taking a seat at the foot of a tree. The enlightened one, intent on jhana, should find delight in the forest, should practice jhana at the foot of a tree, attaining his own satisfaction.” The Buddha
The Buddha. (Source: Nalaka Sutta, Sutta Nipata.)

“‘As I am, so are these. As are these, so am I.’ Drawing the parallel to yourself, neither kill nor get others to kill.” The Buddha

This is a genuine quote from the Buddhist scriptures, said to have been uttered by the Buddha himself:

‘As I am, so are these.
As are these, so am I.’
Drawing the parallel to yourself,
neither kill nor get others to kill.

It’s from a text called the Nalaka Sutta, which is found in the Sutta Nipata)