“Having gone on his almsround, the sage should then go to the forest, standing or taking a seat at the foot of a tree. The enlightened one, intent on jhana, should find delight in the forest, should practice jhana at the foot of a tree, attaining his own satisfaction.” The Buddha

intent on jhana

“Having gone on his almsround, the sage should then go to the forest, standing or taking a seat at the foot of a tree. The enlightened one, intent on jhana, should find delight in the forest, should practice jhana at the foot of a tree, attaining his own satisfaction.” The Buddha
The Buddha. (Source: Nalaka Sutta, Sutta Nipata.)

“I will not look at another’s bowl intent on finding fault: a training to be observed.” The Buddha

a training to be observed

I will not look at another’s bowl intent on finding fault: a training to be observed. The Buddha (from the Vinaya, the Buddha’s code of discipline for monks and nuns).

This is a genuine Buddha Quote.

“Irrigators channel waters; fletchers straighten arrows; carpenters bend wood; the wise master themselves.” The Buddha

selfmastery

This is a genuine Buddha quote. It’s from the Dhammapada, verse 80:

Irrigators channel waters;
fletchers straighten arrows;
carpenters shape wood;
the wise master themselves.

“Conquer anger with non-anger. Conquer badness with goodness. Conquer meanness with generosity. Conquer dishonesty with truth.” The Buddha

conquer anger with non-anger

From the Dhammapada, verse 223:

“Conquer anger with non-anger. Conquer badness with goodness.” The Buddha
“Conquer meanness with generosity. Conquer dishonesty with truth.” The Buddha

“When watching after yourself, you watch after others. When watching after others, you watch after yourself.” The Buddha

watching self others

“When watching after yourself, you watch after others. When watching after others, you watch after yourself.” The Buddha

(From the Samyutta Nikaya)

“Those who cling to perceptions and views wander the world offending people.” The Buddha

offending people

This striking verse is found in the Magandiya Suta in the Sutta Nipata, which is generally held to be one of the oldest texts in the Pali canon.

Bhikkhu Thanissaro translates this as:

“Those who grasp at perceptions and views
go about butting their heads in the world.”

Fausböll, a 19th century pioneer translator, has:

“But those who grasped after marks and philosophical views, they wander about in the world annoying people.”

Suttas.net has:

“Those attached to the notion ‘I am’ and to views
Roam the world offending people.”

The translator notes that “I am” is not in the quotation, but that its inclusion is warranted by material nearby.

The original Pali is:

Saññaca diṭṭhiñca ye aggahesuṃ
Te ghaṭṭayantā vicaranti loketi.

My rendition would be:

Those who cling to perceptions (saññā) and views (diṭṭhi)
Wander (vicarati) the world offending (ghaṭṭeti) people.

[Added later: Bhikkhu Varado’s translation, which I just discovered, is almost identical to mine: “Those attached to perception and views / roam the world offending people.”]

“As a water bead on a lotus leaf, as water on a red lily, does not adhere, so the sage does not adhere to the seen, the heard, or the sensed.” The Buddha

water does not cling

This is a genuine Buddha quote.

As a water bead on a lotus leaf,
as water on a red lily,
does not adhere,

so the sage
does not adhere
to the seen, the heard, or the sensed.

It’s from the Jara (old age) Sutta of the Sutta Nipata.

In the original Pali this is:

Udabindu yathāpi pokkhare
Padume vāri yathā na lippati,
Evaṃ muni no palippati
Yadidaṃ diṭṭhasutaṃ mutesu vā.